I have spent the past week attempting to make the ferrofluid glass encasing completely sealed so the ferrofluid has no chance to leak (that would be bad). It has turned out to be a significantly more difficult process then i originally thought. The silicone sealant I am using requires at least 12 hours to cure, which means no testing for 12 hours after each applied coat.

After finally sealing the glass encasing, I decided to first test with water because I did not want a ferrofluid accident. After filling the glass case with water, I found that there were no leaks for the entire rest of the day. Moving forward I began to fill the bay with ferrofluid to start assembling the display, but there was a critical failure! Since mineral oil has a smaller contact angle than water, the ferrofluid found cracks the water could not…it leaked.

I am in the process of fixing this.

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1 Comment. Leave new

  • Derek Sikora
    Joseph Graff
    May 4, 2016 11:29 pm

    It’s interesting how the aspects of our projects which we think will be the most straightforward are often the ones which end up taking the most time and energy to accomplish. I know that I’ve experienced my fair share of this with my own project, but it’s nice to see that you were able to persevere and accomplish what you set out to do. Do you think that there is anyone that the university with whom you could convene with to pick their brain about sealing enclosures against mineral oil? Maybe there is a different sealant you could source? I’m anxious to see what you come up with!

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