Get it while its Hot and Smoky!

For the up-cycling project, I have decided to make a BBQ smoker out of an old beer keg. The reasons are makeing a BBQ smoker is simple really, I like good food and I like hanging out with friends. Smoking meats adds flavor while still allowing the meat to be very tender. This is done by cooking it at a very low temperature for a very long time (a full rack of ribs could take around 16 hours to cook). What sets smoking apart from other long cooking appliances like crock-pots, is the need for attention. To keep the temperature of the smoker constant, it has to be checked periodically. While some people think that this is a hassle, I would like to make an outing of it. While the smoker is smoking, you can invite people over, hang out, and then enjoy a great dinner or lunch.

Smokers, like everything nowadays, come in many shapes, sizes and complexities. As shown below there are vertical smokers, cabinet smokers (yes they can be made from a filing cabinet), and offset smokers.

Vertical Smoker (source:http://bbq.about.com/od/smokerreviews/gr/Meco-Combination-Electric-Smoker-Grill-Model-5030.htm)

Vertical Smoker (source: http://bbq.about.com/od/smokerreviews/gr/Meco-Combination-Electric-Smoker-Grill-Model-5030.htm)

Commercial cabinet smoker (source: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bradley-Smoker-BS611-Smoker-Bradley-Origanal/41249902)

Commercial cabinet smoker (source: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bradley-Smoker-BS611-Smoker-Bradley-Origanal/41249902)

Actual cabinet smoker (source: http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/78039/filing-cabinet-smoker-finished-pics)

Actual cabinet smoker (source: http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/78039/filing-cabinet-smoker-finished-pics)

Offset Smoker (source: http:/ /www.thesmokerking.com/page4.html)

Offset Smoker (source: http:/ /www.thesmokerking.com/page4.html)

As I was fresh out of cabinets, I started thinking of other things that I could make it out of, and my friend gave me the idea of using a beer keg. As it so happened, another of my friends had a keg that had been sitting in his backyard for a while (at least two years). In addition to this, upon receiving the keg, I deduced that there was still liquid in the bottom (highly technical swishing technique was used to discover this).

My brand new (brand new like a used car) Keg!

My new Keg, only slightly used!

I have not had the… “opportunity” of opening the beast up yet, but it will have to happen sometime. But fear not, I will post again regaling all of the “treasures” that this smoker will hold. Tomorrow, I plan to carefully cut the top off of it, and then spray it with a hose as far away as possible to rinse the “liquid” out. Then, using copious amounts of bleach, I plan to start the process of cleaning, disinfecting, and scrubbing the inside of the keg. Wish me luck!

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3 Comments. Leave new

Peter Brunsgaard
January 31, 2016 11:48 pm

Jeff, this looks super cool! I was thinking about making a keg grill, but settled on another project. I’m curious to see whether you cut the top off the keg, or if you cut out the side. Beer kegs are an incredibly cool aesthetic, and go hand in hand with a well cooked piece of meat.

Reply

Cool, how are you planning on cutting it? Will you keep the top and make a lid?

Reply
Anfal Abdulrahman
January 28, 2016 7:28 pm

The post had some new information for me personally and the project has some useful outcomes and is definitely upcycling. I am just curious about the aesthete side to it. Do you think the shape itself is aesthetic, or are you also thinking of painting and drawing something on it like some of the pictures you have attached?

Meanwhile be safe and good luck!

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